Isabel de Clare (2), b. ca. 1171 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, d. 1220 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Father: Richard "Strongbow" de Clare, b. 1130 in Tunbridge, Kent, England, d. 1 May 1176 in Dublin, Leinster, Ireland, cause of death was an infection of the foot, buried aft. 1 May 1176 in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland
Mother: Eve (Aife) McMurrough, b. ca. 1150 in Leinster, Ireland, d. 1177 in Ireland

Spouse: William I Marshall, b. 1146 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, d. 14 May 1219 in London, Middlesex, England

Father: John "the Marshall" Fitzgilbert, b. ca. 1105 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, d. 1164/5 in Newbury Castle, England
Mother: Sibilla (Sibyl) de Salisbury, b. ca. 1139 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, d. 3 June
William was knighted in 1167, and was travelling with his uncle Patrick, Earl of Salisbury, and Queen Eleanor near the castle Lusignan. The Lusignan brothers attacked and killed Patrick, who was unarmed. William was wounded and taken prisoner while defending the Queen's retreat into the castle, and trying to avenge his uncle's murder. He was ransomed by Queen Eleanor. William was appointed head of the military household in 1170. From then until the death of the young Prince Henry III (whom William knighted in 1173) in 1183, William established his status as an undefeated knight of the tournaments. He fought in 500 matches and never lost. After Prince Henry's death, William took his cross to the Holy Land and joined the Crusades with King Guy of Jerusalem and the Templar Knights.

King Richard I gave William to wife Isabel de Clare. Upon this marriage William inherited all the lands which had been held by Richard Strongbow de Clare, Isabel's father, including Pembroke and Striguil, and the Lordship of Leinster in Ireland.

King John wrongly accused William of treason and began seizing his castles. William refused to fight John, as that would break his oath of fealty. When a bishop persuaded King John to expell his foreign advisors, John realised the error of his ways and restored William's lands to him. Upon John's death in 1216, William was chosen by his peers to act as Regent for young Henry III, who was nine years old. Henry was knighted and crowned under the seal of the Earl of Pembroke.

William served as Marshal of the Royal Household under four kings: Henry II, Richard I "the Lionheart", John Lackland, and Henry III.

It was said that William took two manors that the Bishop of Ferns could not get back. Some years after William's death the Bishop placed a curse on William's family that none of his sons would have children. Each of William's sons became Earl of Pembroke and Marshall of England, but all died without issue.

In one of her essays on William Marshal, Catherine Armstrong says," William might have inherited some of the physical strength and knowledge of military strategy from his father, but as a second son, he would become in his own right and by his own abilities, skills, and sense of honor the best of chivalric knighthood, a "familiaris Regis," the Earl of Pembroke, and the Regent of England."
Married August 1189 in London, Middlesex, England.

Children:

  1. William II Marshall, b. ca. 1190, m. Alice de Bethune, September 1214, m. Eleanor of England, 23 April 1224, d. 6 April 1231, He was appointed justiciar of Ireland, 2 May 1224, He surrendered his office of justiciar of Ireland, 22 June 1226 in Winchester, Hampshire, England, cause of death He was believed to have been poisoned., He was buried next to his father, 15 April 1231 in Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England
  2. Richard Marshall, b. ca. 1192, m. Gervase de Dinan, bef. 1224, d. 16 April 1234 in Kilkenny, Ireland, cause of death Murder, He was buried at the Franciscan Abbey, 16 April 1234 in Kilkenny, Ireland
  3. Maud (Matilda) Marshall, b. ca. 1193, m. Hugh of Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, 1206 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, m. William, Earl of Warenne, aft. February 1225 in Surrey, England, d. 1245
  4. Gilbert Marshall, b. ca. 1195, m. Margaret de Lanvallei, September 1230, m. Marjory, Princess of Scotland, August 1235, d. 27 June 1241 in Ware, Wales, cause of death was from injuries incurred during a tournament.
  5. Walter Marshall (2), b. ca. 1196, m. Margaret de Quincy, 6 January 1242 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, d. 24 November 1245 in Goodrich Castle, Gascony, France
  6. Eve Marshall, b. ca. 1198 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, m. William "Black Will" de Braose, bef. 1219 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, d. 1246
  7. Anselm Marshall, b. ca. 1199, m. Maud de Bohun, bef. 1245, d. 23 December 1245 in Striguil, Wales
  8. Isabel Marshall, b. ca. 1201 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, m. Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, 9 October 1217, m. Richard, Earl of Cornwall, April 1231, d. October 1239 in Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England
  9. Joan (Johanna) Marshall, b. ca. 1204, m. Warin de Munchensi, aft. 1220, d. aft. 1234
  10. Sibilla Marshal, b. ca. 1206, m. William de Ferrers (2), bef. 1219, d. aft. 1238

Richard "Strongbow" de Clare, b. 1130 in Tunbridge, Kent, England, d. 1 May 1176 in Dublin, Leinster, Ireland, cause of death was an infection of the foot, buried aft. 1 May 1176 in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland

Father: Gilbert Fitzgilbert de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, b. 21 September 1100 in Tunbridge, Kent, England, d. 1148 in England, He became the first Earl of Pembroke, 1138 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
Mother: Isabel de Beaumont, b. ca. 1102 in Leicester, Leicestershire, England, d. 1172
Richard Strongbow was a tall man with red hair, freckles, grey eyes, and a weak voice. Gerald of Wales wrote of him, " In war Strongbow was more of a leader than a soldier... . When he took up his position in the midst of battle, he stood firm as an immovable standard around which his men could regroup and take refuge. In war he remained steadfast and reliable in good fortune and bad alike."

Richard was in charge of leading the conquest of Ireland for Henry II, King of England.

The Four Masters say that Strongbow thought he saw St. Brigid in the act of killing him when he died (he destroyed the Church of St. Brigid, among others). Geraldus Cambrensis says he died about the first of June. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Trinity, which is now Christ Church Cathedral.

Spouse: Eve (Aife) McMurrough, b. ca. 1150 in Leinster, Ireland, d. 1177 in Ireland

Father: Diarmaid mac Murchada (Dermod Mac Murrough), b. ca. 1100 in Ireland, d. 4 May 1171 in Ferns, Ireland, cause of death was an insufferable and unknown disease.
Mother: More O'Toole, b. ca. 1110 in Ireland, d. 1164 in Ireland
Married ca. 30 August 1170 in Waterford, Waterford, Ireland.

Children:

  1. Isabel de Clare (2), b. ca. 1171 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, m. William I Marshall, August 1189 in London, Middlesex, England, d. 1220 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
  2. Gilbert de Clare (3), b. ca. 1172 in Ireland, d. 1185

Gilbert Fitzgilbert de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, b. 21 September 1100 in Tunbridge, Kent, England, d. 1148 in England, He became the first Earl of Pembroke, 1138 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Father: Gilbert Fitzrichard de Clare, b. 1065 in Clare, Suffolk, England, d. 1115 in England
Mother: Adeliza de Clermont, b. 1058
Gilbert earned the title of Earl of Pembroke and received property in Pembrokeshire from his successful marauding in Wales. However, one of Gilbert's cousins revolted against King Stephen, who promptly seized his lands. Fearing Gilbert might follow his cousin's lead, King Stephen seized his lands also. This, of course, angered Gilbert, who immediately switched sides to support Empress Matilda against Stephen. After his death, his son, Richard "Strongbow", succeeded to his numerous titles, but without any land to support them.

Spouse: Isabel de Beaumont, b. ca. 1102 in Leicester, Leicestershire, England, d. 1172

Father: Robert of Beaumont
Mother: Isabel (Elizabeth) de Vermondois, b. 1076 in Valois, France, m. William II de Warenne, bef. 1117, d. 13 February 1131 in England
Before she married Gilbert, Isabel was the mistress of King Henry I of England.
Married ca. 1120.

Children:

  1. Agnes de Clare, b. ca. 1112 in Tunbridge, Kent, England
  2. Baldwin de Clare, b. ca. 1114 in Tunbridge, Kent, England
  3. Richard "Strongbow" de Clare, b. 1125 in Tunbridge, Kent, England, m. Eve (Aife) McMurrough, ca. 30 August 1170 in Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, d. 1 May 1176 in Dublin, Leinster, Ireland, cause of death was an infection of the foot, buried aft. 1 May 1176 in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland
  4. Basilia de Clare, b. ca. 1136 in Tunbridge, Kent, England, m. Robert de Quency, bef. 1173, m. Raymond le Gros, ca. 1175 in Ireland, m. Robert Fitz Stephen, ca. 1179