Alfred the Great, b. 849 in Wantage, Berkshire, England, d. 26 October 899, He was crowned King of West Saxons, 23 April 871 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried 28 October 899 in Hyde Abbey, Winchester, England

Father: Aethelvulf, King of England, b. 795 in Aachen, Rhineland, Germany, d. 13 January 858, He was crowned King of England, 4 February 839 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried aft. 13 January 858 in Steyning, England, buried aft. 860 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England
Mother: Osburga, d. 855
The only English king to be called Great, Alfred prevented the Danish conquest of England, defeating them at Edington in 878 after a campaign of guerrila warfare. After his victory, he allowed the Danes to keep their conquests in Mercia and East Anglia provided that Guthrum, their king, was converted to Christianity. Alfred built a navy of warships to defend the south coast against further Danish invasions (885-886, 892-896) and protected Wessex with a chain of fortifications. He took London in 886 thus gaining control of all England except the Danish areas.

Alfred was taken to visit the Pope in Rome twice, and learned to read and write in his teens. He believed the language of ordinary education should be English, but there were few books in English available. So Alfred learned Latin and translated Latin books into the Anglo-Saxon language. He became the founder of English prose and the first English man of letters who was not a clergyman. He translated Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People and St. Augustine's Soliloquies so that Englishmen could read their history in their own language. He also began the running history of England called the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, that continued to be written for hundreds of years and is one of the sources used for this book.

In January of 878, the Danes under Gorm (Guthrum) the Old attacked Chippenham, where Alfred was spending Christmas. The English were soundly defeated and Alfred barely escaped into the woods and swamps, finally arriving at the fort of Athelney. There is a story that while making his way through the swamps, Alfred was given shelter by a peasant woman who was not aware of his identity. She left him to watch some cakes she had cooking over the fire. Being distracted by his situation, Alfred let the cakes burn. The woman scolded him when she returned, until she realized who he was. She then appologised, but Alfred insisted that he was the one to appologise. Alfred was supposed to have also disguised himself as a harpist to get into Gorm's camp to discover the Danes' plans.

The are three primary reforms instituted by Alfred that had lasting effects on the military operations in England for generations to come: 1) division of the national militia into two, relieving each other at set intervals, so as to ensure continuity in military operations, 2) the building of strongholds (burgs) and garrisons at certain points, 3) the enforcement of the obligations of thanehood on all owners of five hides of land, thus giving the king a nucleus of highly equiped troops.

Spouse: Aethelswitha of the Gaini, b. ca. 850 in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, England, d. 5 December 905 in Winchester, Cheshire, England

Father: Æthelred "The Great" Mucil, d. 866, He became Ealdorman of the Gaini, 830
Mother: Eadburga
Her name is sometimes spelled "Ealhswith".
Married 868 in Winchester, Cheshire, England.

Children:

  1. Edward the Elder, b. 869 in Wessex, England, m. Ecgwyn, ca. 893, m. Aelflaeda, aft. 899, m. Eadgifu (Edgiva), ca. 919, d. 17 July 924 in Farndon-on-Dee, England, He was crowned King of England 26 October 899 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried aft. 17 July 924 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England
  2. Ethelflada, Queen of Mercia, b. ca. 869, d. 918
  3. Edmund, b. ca. 870
  4. Aelfthryth, b. ca. 873, m. Baldwin II "The Bald", Count of Flanders, ca. 893, d. 7 June 929 in Flanders, Belgium
  5. Aethelgeofu, Abbess of Shaftesbury, b. ca. 876
  6. Aethelweard, b. ca. 880

Aethelvulf, King of England, b. 795 in Aachen, Rhineland, Germany, m. Judith Martel, 1 October 856 in Verberie sur Oise, France, d. 13 January 858, He was crowned King of England, 4 February 839 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried aft. 13 January 858 in Steyning, England, buried aft. 860 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England

Father: Ecgbert III, King of Wessex, b. ca. 770 in Wessex, England, d. 4 February 839 in Cornwall, England, He became King of Wessex, 802 in Wessex, England, buried aft. 4 February 839 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England
Mother: Redburga
Aethelvulf (or Ethelwulf) was Under-King of Kent from 825 to 839 and again from 856 until his death in 858. Renowned for his military prowess, he reputedly defeated 350 Viking ships in 851. He reduced taxation, endowed the Church, made lay lands inheritable, and provided systems of poor relief.

Following Osburga's death, Aethelwulf went on a pilgrimage to Rome with his youngest son, Alfred. He was deposed by his eldest son, Aethelbald, upon his return in 856.

Spouse: Osburga, d. 855

Father: Oslac "The Thane"
Married ca. 830, divorced 853.

Children:

  1. Athelstan, King of Kent, b. ca. 832
  2. Aethelbald, King of England, b. ca. 834, m. Judith Martel, aft. February 858 in England, d. 860, He deposed his father to become King of England, 856 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England
  3. Aethelbert, King of England, b. 835 in Wessex, England, d. 865, He became King of England, 860 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried aft. 865 in Sherborne Abbey, Dorset, England
  4. Aethelred I, King of England, b. 837 in Wessex, England, m. Wulfrida, ca. 857, d. 23 April 871 in Merton, England, He became King of England, 865 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, cause of death was the Battle of Merton, buried aft. 23 April 871 in Wimborne, Dorset, England
  5. Alfred the Great, b. 849 in Wantage, Berkshire, England, m. Aethelswitha of the Gaini, 868 in Winchester, Cheshire, England, d. 26 October 899, He was crowned King of West Saxons, 23 April 871 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried 28 October 899 in Hyde Abbey, Winchester, England
  6. Aethelswyth, b. ca. 851

Ecgbert III, King of Wessex, b. ca. 770 in Wessex, England, d. 4 February 839 in Cornwall, England, He became King of Wessex, 802 in Wessex, England, buried aft. 4 February 839 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England

Father: Ealhmund, Under-King of Kent, d. 786, He became Under-King of Kent, 784
Mother: Daughter of Kent
Ecgbert was exiled by Beorhtric, who became King of Wessex after the death of King Cynewulf in 786, and King Offa of Mercia. He spent his exile with the Franks on the mainland. The West Saxons acknowledged him as king after the death of Beorhtric in 802. Ecgbert conquered the West Welsh (probably Cornwall) in 815, and defeated Beornwulf of Mercia ten years later. The other kingdoms either submitted to him or were conquered after that. Mercia did regain it's independence in 830 under Wiglaf, but it is not known if this was the result of a rebellion or a grant to Wiglaf by Ecgbert. He was succeeded by his son, Aethelwulf (Ethelwulf).

Spouse: Redburga

She is said to be the sister of Charlemagne, but there is no information to connect them at this time.
Married.

Children:

  1. Athelstan, Sub-King of Kent
  2. Editha, Abbess of Polesworth
  3. Aethelvulf, King of England, b. 795 in Aachen, Rhineland, Germany, m. Osburga, ca. 830, div. 853, m. Judith Martel, 1 October 856 in Verberie sur Oise, France, d. 13 January 858, He was crowned King of England, 4 February 839 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried aft. 13 January 858 in Steyning, England, buried aft. 860 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England

Ealhmund, Under-King of Kent, d. 786, He became Under-King of Kent, 784

Father: Eaba

Spouse: Daughter of Kent

Father: Aethelbert II, King of Kent, d. 762, He became the joint King of Kent 725 in Kent, England
Married.

Children:

  1. (St.) Alburga
  2. Ecgbert III, King of Wessex, b. ca. 770 in Wessex, England, m. Redburga, d. 4 February 839 in Cornwall, England, He became King of Wessex, 802 in Wessex, England, buried aft. 4 February 839 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England

Eaba

Father: Eoppa
He married a Kentish princess whose name we do not know.

Children:

  1. Ealhmund, Under-King of Kent, m. Daughter of Kent, d. 786, He became Under-King of Kent, 784

Eoppa

Father: Ingild, d. 718

Children:

  1. Eaba

Ingild, d. 718

Father: Cenred

Children:

  1. Eoppa

Cenred

Father: Ceolwald

Children:

  1. Cuthburh
  2. Ingild, d. 718
  3. Cwenburh, Abbess of Wimborne
  4. Ine, King of Wessex

Ceolwald

Father: Cuthwulf (Cutha)

Children:

  1. Cenred

Cuthwulf (Cutha)

Father: Cuthwine

Children:

  1. Ceolwald

Cuthwine

Father: Ceawlin, King of Wessex, d. 593, He became King of Wessex, 560 in Wessex, England, He was deposed as King of Wessex by Ceolric, 591 in Wessex, England

Children:

  1. Cynebald
  2. Chad (Cedda)
  3. Cuthwulf (Cutha)

Ceawlin, King of Wessex, d. 593, He became King of Wessex, 560 in Wessex, England, He was deposed as King of Wessex by Ceolric, 591 in Wessex, England

Father: Cynric, King of Wessex, d. 560, He became King of Wessex, 534 in Wessex, England

Children:

  1. Cuthwine

Cynric, King of Wessex, d. 560, He became King of Wessex, 534 in Wessex, England

Father: Creoda

Children:

  1. Ceawlin, King of Wessex, d. 593, He became King of Wessex, 560 in Wessex, England, He was deposed as King of Wessex by Ceolric, 591 in Wessex, England
  2. Cutha, King of Wessex

Creoda

Father: Cerdic, King of Wessex, He became King of Wessex, 532 in Winchester, Cheshire, England
Not all genealogies list Creoda.

Children:

  1. Cynric, King of Wessex, d. 560, He became King of Wessex, 534 in Wessex, England

Cerdic, King of Wessex, He became King of Wessex, 532 in Winchester, Cheshire, England

Father: Elesa
He was known as the first King of West Saxons. Some sources say he was crowned in 519.

Children:

  1. Creoda

Elesa

Father: Elsa

Children:

  1. Cerdic, King of Wessex, He became King of Wessex, 532 in Winchester, Cheshire, England

Elsa

Father: Gewis

Children:

  1. Elesa

Gewis

Father: Wig (Uvigg)

Children:

  1. Elsa

Wig (Uvigg)

Father: Freawine (Freóvin)

Children:

  1. Gewis

Freawine (Freóvin)

Father: Frithogar (Frjódigar)

Children:

  1. Wig (Uvigg)

Frithogar (Frjódigar)

Father: Brond (Brandr)

Children:

  1. Freawine (Freóvin)

Brond (Brandr)

Father: Baeldaeg (Balder)

Children:

  1. Bernic
  2. Frithogar (Frjódigar)

Baeldaeg (Balder)

Father: Odin (Woden), d. 055
Mother: Frigg (Frígídá)
The Prose Edda says he was the second son and had lands in Westphalia.

Children:

  1. Brond (Brandr)

Spouse: Nanna

Married.

Oslac "The Thane"

Father: Unknown Wihtgar
He was king of the Isle of Wight and Grand Butler of England.

He may have had other children.

Children:

  1. Osburga, m. Aethelvulf, King of England, ca. 830, div. 853, d. 855

Unknown Wihtgar

Father: Wihtgar, d. 544

Children:

  1. Oslac "The Thane"

Wihtgar, d. 544

He is an ancestor of Osburga, the mother of Alfred the Great. The name of his mother is unknown but she is believed to be daughter of Elesa, mother of a Stuf and Wihtgar. The lineage from him to Oslac "The Thane" is unknown.

Children:

  1. Unknown Wihtgar

Judith Martel, b. October 844, d. 870
Father: Charles II "the Bald", King of the Franks, b. 13 June 823 in Frankfurt, Germany, d. 6 October 877 in Modano, France, He became King of West Franks in 843, He became King of Italy 875 in Italy
Mother: Ermentrude, b. ca. 825 in Orléans, France, d. 6 October 869
Judith was forced by her father to marry Aethelwulf when she was 13 and he was 51. After Aethelwulf died she married his son, Aethelbald. After Aethelbald died she had the marriage annulled and was confined at Senlis. She eloped with Baldwin and they hid with her uncle Lothaire (Lothar I) until October. They then fled to Pope Nicholas I for protection, and were officially married at Auxerre.

Spouse: Aethelvulf, King of England, b. 795 in Aachen, Rhineland, Germany, m. Osburga, ca. 830, div. 853, d. 13 January 858, He was crowned King of England, 4 February 839 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried aft. 13 January 858 in Steyning, England, buried aft. 860 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England

Father: Ecgbert III, King of Wessex, b. ca. 770 in Wessex, England, d. 4 February 839 in Cornwall, England, He became King of Wessex, 802 in Wessex, England, buried aft. 4 February 839 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England
Mother: Redburga
Aethelvulf (or Ethelwulf) was Under-King of Kent from 825 to 839 and again from 856 until his death in 858. Renowned for his military prowess, he reputedly defeated 350 Viking ships in 851. He reduced taxation, endowed the Church, made lay lands inheritable, and provided systems of poor relief.

Following Osburga's death, Aethelwulf went on a pilgrimage to Rome with his youngest son, Alfred. He was deposed by his eldest son, Aethelbald, upon his return in 856.
Married 1 October 856 in Verberie sur Oise, France.

Spouse: Aethelbald, King of England, b. ca. 834, d. 860, He deposed his father to become King of England, 856 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England

Father: Aethelvulf, King of England, b. 795 in Aachen, Rhineland, Germany, d. 13 January 858, He was crowned King of England, 4 February 839 in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, buried aft. 13 January 858 in Steyning, England, buried aft. 860 in Winchester Cathedral, London, England
Mother: Osburga, d. 855
Aethelbald (or Ethelbald) deposed his father in 856, and married his new mother-in-law after his father's death in 858.
Married aft. February 858 in England.

Spouse: Baldwin I "Bras der Fer", Count of Flanders, b. in Flanders, Belgium, d. 879 in Auxerre, France, He acceded to Count of Flanders 864 in Flanders, Belgium

Baldwin "Bras der Fer" (of the Iron Arm) received the county of Flanders as a hereditary fief from King Charles "the Bald" upon his marriage to Princess Judith.

He successfully defended the northern coast from the Norse hordes.
Married January 862 in Senlis, France.

Children:

  1. Charles, b. ca. 863
  2. Baldwin II "The Bald", Count of Flanders, b. 864 in Flanders, Belgium, m. Aefthryth, ca. 893, d. 10 September 918, He acceded to Count of Flanders 879 in Flanders, Belgium
  3. Ralph, Count & Abbot of Cambrai, b. 865
  4. Gunhilda, b. ca. 866





Ancestor families report created by Gene 4.3.4, Sun, Dec 4, 2005